Recent Foodie Reads: Food as Philosophy, Healing Technique, and Revolution

Great British Bake Off contestant and Guardian columnist Ruby Tandoh's book melding food, memoir, and life philosophy, Eat Up: Food, Appetite and Eating What You Want, has been a UK bestseller since its 2018 release, and apparently is getting a US release next month, although the Queens Public Library already had it. I read it... Continue Reading →

Women Doing Amazing Things: Cold War Journalist Katharine Clark and the Teenage Girls of Downeast Maine

Some minis on remarkable women doing amazing things today, because we can always use more of that. The Double Life of Katharine Clark: The Untold Story of the Fearless Journalist Who Risked Her Life for Truth and Justice, by Katharine Gregorio. Published March 15, 2022 by Sourcebooks Used or new @SecondSale.com Quite the incredible story... Continue Reading →

Recent Russia Reads in Minis

Sadly, Russia's war of aggression in Ukraine just passed its 100th day. Although Russia is forever one of my favorite reading topics, I had been pretty measured about it in recent years. Wanting more information about what's going on led me to push a few titles off my backlist, plus some in-translation new releases. I'm... Continue Reading →

Lonely Essays and a Literary Fever Dream

Editor Natalie Eve Garrett's Eat Joy was an essay collection I adored: well-known writers from a spectrum of backgrounds and genres writing about their favorite comfort foods, or what that concept meant to them. Her latest curated collection The Lonely Stories: 22 Celebrated Writers on the Joys & Struggles of Being Alone follows a similar... Continue Reading →

Curry and Khabaar

Given my obsession with Indian food and curries of all kinds it only seemed fitting to learn more about them. Madhushree Ghosh's memoir-in-essays Khabaar: An Immigrant Journey of Food, Memory, and Family (April 4, University Of Iowa Press) weaves together fragments of her life, both brighter and darker ones, loosely linked through food. It includes... Continue Reading →

The “Dark Legacy” of the Nazi Billionaires

Nazi Billionaires: The Dark History of Germany's Wealthiest Dynasties, by David de Jong (published April 19, 2022 by Mariner Books) In the newly released and fairly jaw-dropping Nazi Billionaires, Dutch journalist David de Jong, a Bloomberg News reporter on wealth and finance, profiles five German-Austrian families (the Quandts, Flicks, von Fincks, Porsche-Piëchs, and Oetkers) whose... Continue Reading →

Susan Cain On the Benefits of Bittersweet

We're living, famously, through a time in which we have trouble connecting with others, especially outside our "tribes." And Keltner's work shows us that sadness--Sadness, of all things!--has the power to create the "union between souls" that we so desperately lack. Susan Cain is the author of Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World... Continue Reading →

Two Women’s Stories Of Family and Identity

Genealogy research through affordable DNA testing has been a popular topic in nonfiction lately, as it is in the news in general, I suppose. I made genetics-related nonfiction the subject of a Nonfiction November Expert Week post two years ago. Two recent memoirs by women look at different aspects of heritage and identity, taking their... Continue Reading →

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