Tea Partiers in Their Own Words

Book review: Strangers in Their Own Land, by Arlie Russell Hochschild (Amazon / Book Depository) In the last decade, but especially the last few years, we've seen an especially polarizing shift between the American political left and right, culminating in the election of a previously non-politically-involved narcissistic billionaire (or is he?) bully with an inferiority complex. But even... Continue Reading →

Guilt, Grief, and Finally Getting the Truth

Book review: Alligator Candy, by David Kushner When he was four years old, journalist and writer David Kushner's older brother Jon took off on his bike, riding through the woods of their neighborhood in Tampa, Florida en route to the 7-11, on a quest for candy. Before he left, David asked him to bring him the... Continue Reading →

Musings on Art and Loneliness

Book review: The Lonely City, by Olivia Laing "It was becoming increasingly easy to see how people ended up vanishing in cities, disappearing in plain sight, retreating into their apartments because of sickness or bereavement, mental illness or the persistent, unbearable burden of sadness and shyness, not knowing how to impress themselves into the world." Olivia Laing... Continue Reading →

Some Light Hollywood Trash-Talking

Book review: Kathy Griffin's Celebrity Run-Ins, by Kathy Griffin I love Kathy Griffin's standup. Sometimes if I'm feeling down, clips of her energetic, overexcited, judgmental storytelling work as a quick fix cheerer-upper. I haven't read her other book, Official Book Club Selection, which I think got positive reviews, but I started reading this one when I couldn't focus on... Continue Reading →

Essays from the Outdoors

Book review: Upstream, by Mary Oliver (Amazon / Book Depository) 'Come with me into the field of sunflowers' is a better line than anything you will find here, and the sunflowers themselves far more wonderful than any words about them. Quoting herself, renowned and much-loved poet Mary Oliver opens this collection of essays about nature and our... Continue Reading →

Dark History in the City of Eternal Moonlight

Book review: The Midnight Assassin, by Skip Hollingsworth (Amazon / Book Depository) Journalist Skip Hollingsworth asks near the beginning of The Midnight Assassin: "Why is it that certain sensational events in history are remembered and others, just as dramatic, are completely forgotten?"  Jack the Ripper committed his notorious murders in London's East End a mere three... Continue Reading →

How it Feels When a Cold Case Warms Up

Book review: Jane Doe January, by Emily Winslow Some years ago, I made the decision to stop reading a book if I wasn't enjoying it. Life is short and my reading list is never-ending. 40-odd pages into Jane Doe January, I put it aside with no desire to continue, and I'm not sure why I eventually did. I think because I'd... Continue Reading →

In Support of the Shy

Book review: Shrinking Violets, by Joe Moran Shyness is about much more than just shrinking away. Violets "shrink" not in retreating from the world but in evincing nature's talent for endless variation and for sustaining life in the most varied habitats. Shyness, too, can flourish in many climates and soils and express itself in many... Continue Reading →

We’re All Done Here, 2016

As the year closes, I want to sincerely thank everyone who reads and follows What's Nonfiction. I've loved sharing my thoughts on books and stories, new and old, hearing your opinions, and following your own writings and art. I hope the next year continues to bring connections with bloggers and readers. One of the best parts of reading... Continue Reading →

Better Off Dead?

Book review: Playing Dead: A Journey Through the World of Death Fraud by Elizabeth Greenwood (Amazon / Book Depository) What a fun read this is, considering the weightiness of the subject matter! Elizabeth Greenwood needs an out from her life - saddled with the burden of crushing student debt, frustrated working a job that will never... Continue Reading →

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